WATER SYSTEM & QUALITY
2018 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT
                                          Virgin Town, Utah
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VIRGIN TOWN, UTAH, USA
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CROSS CONNECTIONS & BACK-FLOW INFORMATION



THERMAL EXPANSION

Thermal expansion occurs when cold water is heated in the hot water heater.  As the water heats, it expands and increases the pressure of a closed system.

The Virgin Town Water Department is installing back-flow prevention devices known as a 'Dual Check Valves' in each water meter connection in Town.  You may have one installed on your water meter connection.  This device protects the water supply system by preventing "back-flow" (water from flowing backwards) into the public water system lines, and creates a closed system on the customer's side of the meter.
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The International Plumbing Code (IPC) 607.3.2 states:  "a water system with a back-flow device, that creates a closed system, must be equipped with a device for controlling pressure."

The best protection method to maintain a required water pressure is with installation of an expansion chamber.  This chamber has a bladder in it which expands as the pressure increases, preventing  pressure from water pressure from developing.

WE encourage all customers of the Virgin Water Department to be in compliance with this IPC Regulation 607.3.2.  

For more information, visit DDW/DEQ Back-flow Cross Connections Rules & Regulations 

WATER CONSERVATION
To look around Utah,  most would never guess that it is actually the second-driest state in the nation – averaging only 13 inches of water each year.  Working together to practice easy water conservation techniques, such as water-wise landscaping is a huge step toward ensuring enough water for now and into the future. 

DO YOUR PART - BE WATER SMART
What can you do to use water efficiently?  

Landscaping Tips

Diversify your landscape.  Add hardscaping to existing landscape.  Hardscaping can be more water and energy efficient, which can save you money - plus, it is natural to our area and looks much better.

Use low-water use and adapted plants and trees.   Ask your local nursery professional about Utah-friendly landscape materials, such as low-water use plants, bushes, trees, and turf grasses. 

Mulch It!  A good, thick layer of mulch (we're talking 3 to 4 inches here, folks) cools flowerbeds, inhibits weed growth, and slows the evaporation of water from the soil.  Place mulch around the bases of trees, shrubs and flowers to reduce evaporation.

Design for hydrozoning.  Consider the water needs of all plants included in your individual irrigation zones. Use plants with similar water needs in the same areas.

For more information, please visit

SLOW THE FLOW 

Water Wise Utah

Rural Water Association of Utah

Utah Division of Water Resources

Washington County Water Conservancy District